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EarthQuakes

What causes earthquakes?

Use the websites above and below to answer these questions:

  1. What are the three types of plate movement and what do they look like?
  2. How thick are the plates and how far do they move in one year?
  3. What is the earth made up of, explain the 3 major layers. 
  4. What is the ring of fire and what does it have to do with earthquakes?

*   Major Tectonic Plates of the World http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Glossary/PlateTectonics/Maps/map_plate_tectonics_world.html

        *   Tectonic Plates http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/dynamic/understanding.html

        *    The Ring of Fire http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Glossary/PlateTectonics/Graphics/framework.html

How often and why do earthquakes occur in California?

Use the websites above and below to answer these questions:

1.    Where do most of the earthquakes in California take place?

2.    Why do they take place in those areas?

3.    Why do so many earthquakes occur in California?

        *  Maps of recent earthquake activity in California and Nevada     http://quake.usgs.gov/recenteqs/latest.htm

        * Up-to-the-minute Southern California Earthquake map-  http://www.crustal.ucsb.edu/scec/webquakes/ 

        *  Cool Earthquake Facts http://earthquake.usgs.gov/4kids/

What needs to be done to prepare for earthquakes and how can you stay safe during one?

Use the websites above and below to answer these questions:

1.    What are the major dangers of earthquakes?

2.    What can you do to be prepared for an earthquake?

3.    List your suggestions to keep families safe in an earthquake.

4.    Make a list of supplies families should have on hand for all emergencies.

         *      Are you ready for an earthquake http://earthquake.usgs.gov/4kids/ready.html

       *     Earthquake Safety Quiz http://www.firepals.org/FPQuizE.html

       *     Earthquake preparedness http://earthquake.usgs.gov/faq/prepare.html 
 
  1. Around 1912, German meteorologist Alfred Wegener developed a theory called continental drift. He believed that about 225 million years ago, giant landmasses gradually shifted and broke apart to form the continents as we know them today. How many original "supercontinents" did Wegener's theory of continental drift assume?
  2. The Earth's crust is made up of a series twelve interconnected landmasses are called tectonic plates. What are the major plates that affect the United States? (scroll down and click through the "How Earthquakes Happen" animation)
  3. Check out this hazard map showing probability for earthquakes. Why do you think California has so many earthquakes but Florida doesn't? In what hazard zone is your home located?
  4. What is considered to be the most destructive earthquake in history? When did it occur, where was it, what was its magnitude and how many people died?
  5. What are the three basic types of plate boundaries? Describe each briefly.
  6. What are tsunamis, what causes them and how fast do they travel?
  7. What are the two types of energy waves created by an earthquake and how do they differ? Which type of wave travels faster?
  8. How much more energy is released by a 7.2 earthquake than by a 6.2 earthquake?
  9. What applications does seismology have besides measuring the magnitude and location of earthquakes?
  10. Where did most of the earthquakes happen last week?
  11. Can scientists predict earthquakes?
  12. How do scientists know where an earthquake actually occurred?

EarthQuakes in the last 12 years of magnitude  http://www.ncedc.org/ncedc/catalog-search.html

  • start_time=1996
  • end_time=2008
  • minimum_magnitude=5.0
Date       Time             Lat       Lon  Depth   Mag Magt  Nst Gap  Clo  RMS  SRC   Event ID
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1989/10/18 00:04:15.19  37.0362 -121.8798  17.43  7.00   ML   80  89    1 0.08 NCSN     216859 
1996/01/07 14:32:52.63  35.7618 -117.6458   9.90  5.10   Mw   15 142   12 0.10 NCSN   30093667 
1996/07/24 20:15:41.48  41.9087 -126.2343   2.82  5.70   Mw   75 270  178 0.13 NCSN   30114284 
1996/11/27 20:17:23.54  36.0937 -117.6255   6.58  5.10   Mw   16 236   16 0.05 NCSN     485893 
1997/01/22 07:17:16.81  40.2737 -124.3792  23.69  5.60   Mw   22 217    7 0.08 NCSN     492079 
1997/01/26 06:23:19.44  40.2813 -124.3965  22.26  5.20   Mw   19 230    8 0.11 NCSN     492691 
1997/09/21 12:36:27.11  41.5983 -126.2373   0.78  5.30   Mw   67 294  192 0.15 NCSN     521969 
1997/10/04 10:57:34.18  41.0528 -125.3433   7.17  5.50   Mw  139 245  106 0.15 NCSN     524039 
1997/10/26 10:44:06.41  41.0663 -125.3235   4.98  5.20   Mw  190 232  106 0.26 NCSN     528810 
1997/11/02 08:51:52.78  37.8787 -118.1660   9.05  5.30   Mw   40 252   27 0.10 NCSN   30148579 
1998/08/12 14:10:25.14  36.7545 -121.4615   9.11  5.10   Mw   78  35    4 0.19 NCSN   30190473 
1998/11/26 19:49:53.69  40.6232 -122.4080  24.21  5.10   Mw   32  45   11 0.20 NCSN   30207228 
1998/11/27 00:43:49.06  40.6737 -125.2922   4.87  5.40   Mw  157 254   84 0.26 NCSN   30207272 
1999/05/15 13:22:10.66  37.5297 -118.8172   5.62  5.50   Mw   30 112    6 0.04 NCSN   21014765 
1999/08/01 16:06:21.75  37.4008 -117.1153   0.04  5.70   Mw   53 229  103 0.17 NCSN   21066210 
1999/08/02 06:05:13.84  37.3732 -117.1770   2.96  5.10   Mw   55 242  106 0.07 NCSN   21040015 
1999/10/16 09:46:46.39  34.6028 -116.3380  24.00  7.00   Mw   48 216  132 0.21 NCSN   21059631 
2000/01/08 02:17:29.02  40.3900 -126.4790   5.00  5.50   Mw  264 256  182 0.40 NCSN   21076245 
2000/03/16 15:19:56.38  40.3887 -125.2385   5.55  5.70   Mw  139 228   77 0.29 NCSN   21086915 
2001/01/13 13:08:42.10  40.7557 -125.2445   2.61  5.40   Mw  155 233   83 0.26 NCSN   21143281 
2001/07/17 12:07:25.83  36.0127 -117.8663   8.68  5.20   Mw   15 177   19 0.06 NCSN   21181820 
2001/08/10 20:19:27.06  39.8112 -120.6167   6.99  5.20   Mw   76 111   35 0.34 NCSN   21188442 
2002/06/17 16:55:07.68  40.8098 -124.5520  18.06  5.20   Mw   63 225   41 0.16 NCSN   21231051 
2003/08/15 09:22:15.65  40.9787 -125.3573   8.52  5.00   Mw   82 251  103 0.19 NCSN   21299771 
2003/12/22 19:15:56.24  35.7005 -121.1005   8.70  6.50   Mw   58  71    5 0.07 NCSN   21323712 
2004/09/18 23:02:17.75  38.0095 -118.6785   5.49  5.55   Mw   50  55    6 0.08 NCSN   21396205 
2004/09/18 23:43:31.71  38.0112 -118.6775   7.01  5.15   Md   21  71    6 0.08 NCSN   30500747 
2004/09/18 23:43:41.79  38.0187 -118.6625  10.24  5.40   Mw   50 178    7 0.09 NCSN   30500748 
2004/09/28 17:15:24.25  35.8182 -120.3660   8.58  5.90   Mw   60  26    2 0.04 NCSN   30228270 
2004/09/29 17:10:04.03  35.9537 -120.5022  11.37  5.00   Mw   62  33    0 0.07 NCSN   21401069 
2004/09/29 22:54:53.93  35.3865 -118.6287   9.16  5.00   Mw   17 121   18 0.06 NCSN   21400816 
2004/09/30 18:54:28.84  35.9880 -120.5378  10.55  5.00   Mw   63  27    2 0.05 NCSN   21401170 
2005/06/15 02:50:51.69  41.2403 -125.9842   5.00  7.10   Mw  197 251  163 0.43 NCSN   21462362 
2006/07/19 11:41:43.46  40.2807 -124.4332  20.69  5.00   Mw   32 223   23 0.09 NCSN   21527987 
2007/02/26 12:19:54.48  40.6428 -124.8662   0.01  5.40   Mw   87 241   48 0.19 NCSN   40193932 
2007/05/09 07:50:03.83  40.3745 -125.0162   0.17  5.20   Mw   56 239   62 0.14 NCSN   51181705 
2007/06/25 02:32:24.62  41.1155 -124.8245   3.36  5.00   Mw  177 213   67 0.28 NCSN   51183469 
2007/10/31 03:04:54.81  37.4335 -121.7743  10.11  5.45   Mw  164  50    3 0.11 NCSN   40204628 
2007/11/19 20:32:47.00  43.5410 -127.5070  10.00  5.50   Mw   12 303  260 0.99 NCSN   40205861
2008/02/21 14:16:04.69  41.0770 -114.7520  17.00  6.28   ML   47 281  357 0.62 NCSN   51196838 
2008/04/26 06:40:10.95  39.5235 -119.9318   3.50  5.13   ML   33  93   10 0.16 NCSN   40216182 
2008/04/30 03:03:06.90  40.8358 -123.4968  29.13  5.40   Mw   33  36   20 0.14 NCSN   40216664 
2008/07/29 18:42:15.15  33.9318 -117.7627  13.96  5.40   Mw   26 101   32 0.16 NCSN   40221331 
2008/11/28 13:42:18.46  40.3902 -127.1033  20.21  5.90   Mw   76 278  235 0.30 NCSN   40226949 
2008/12/06 04:18:42.81  34.8228 -116.4060   8.67  5.10   Mw   13 113    7 0.15 NCSN   51212441  

5 or greater

 

Your paper must contain the following items.

  1. Title page must be Properly formatted with title, name, date, subject and teacher and an appropriate picture.
  2. Table of contents needs to list all main pages and their content
  3. You need a minimum of 750 to 1000 words for both pages.
  4. Illustrations or pictures must be spread throughout the report. If pictures are copied from the internet then their should be a caption or footnote acknowledging where they came from contained in your works cited page.
  5. Works cited must be properly formatted as noted below..

TITLE Page (5 pts)

Human and Economic impact(10 pts)

TABLE OF CONTENTS (5 pts)

EXTRA CREDIT  for endangered, USA, Ca. or Stanislaus county animals

Information (45pts)
Conventions (15 pts)

 

OVERALL GRADE

ILLUSTRATIONS(10 pts)

 

WORKS CITED(10 pts)

 

Rubric for Content

Grade

Information 35 pts

Conventions 15pts

Presentation Design

A

The Best Writers

The BEST writers always have a clear idea of what to write about. The Best writers always introduce the topic in CLEAR and INTERESTING ways.  Uses the 5 senses, physical description to identify people, places, objects, background and actions. There is always a clear conclusion in this writing

The best writers always checks for spelling, grammar and punctuation errors. They edit before they re-write the final draft.  The reader rarely sees these kinds of errors in a well written paper

Slides are arranged in a logical and thoughtful manner that leads the viewer on a journey that will help through the view of both pictures and words to understand the historical information you are presenting. Each presentation should have many pictures and animations with a clear summary of the most important points. All presentations will have at least on hyperlink to the internet.

B

Capable Writers

 (Adequate achievement but with a little planning and work it could be better!) Capable writers identify the topic and write a good introduction.  They are interested in the topic but sometimes the writing is unbalances and needs a little work, but the reader can understand what is written. Not as much detailed descriptions contained in the writing.

The reader occasionally finds spelling, grammar and punctuation errors, but the errors don't interfere with understanding the writers paper. This writer needs to practice writing every day to get better.

Slides are arranged in a fairly logical and thoughtful manner that leads the viewer on a journey that will help through the view of both pictures and words to understand the historical information you are presenting. Each presentation should have many pictures and animations with a  fairly clear summary of the most important points. All presentations will have at least on hyperlink to the internet.

C

Almost Writes

 (some evidence of achievement but by 6th grade, this is not great)

Writer is usually unorganized, rambles on, and has little meaningful pattern to the writing assignment.  Does not restate or clarify.  Most of the time, this writer has NOT done a pre-write or brainstormed ideas, words, or conclusions.

 

The reader continually finds spelling, grammar and punctuation errors.  The paper is readable, but there are so many errors that the reader is confused or struggles to get through the whole paper. This writer needs practice in the whole writing process!

 

D

Limited Writer

No topic identified

Little meaningful information

Very poorly organized

 

The reader is bothered by many spelling, grammar and punctuation errors. It is apparent that the student has very little understanding of Standard English.

 

F

No Paper-  This is not acceptable, you will be asked to stay in at Lunch and after school until the Monday question is complete. 

How to make correct citations.
Follow this form please!  Make sure that all of your citations are in alphabetical order.

Book:  AUTHOR’S last name, TITLE (underlined) PLACE of publication, PUBLISHER, DATE of publication, PAGES used to get the information.
Apple, Victor, The Way They Play. New York. Dodd Mead and Company, 1982/ pp. 43-45

Encyclopedia:  NAME of the article, NAME of the encyclopedia (underline).  YEAR .  VOLUME.  PAGES.       
 “Tides.” Encyclopedia Britannica. 1985. Vol. 22. pp/ 93-95

 Computer Programs:   TITLE (underline), Computer software company . Version number, PLACE of Company . YEAR. KIND of software (CD, disk, etc)
Math For Millions, International Math Council, Version 1.5, Chicago. 1999 CD rom.

WWW:  Copy and paste the entire web address onto your paper.  Next to this, give a description of the cite;
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/databank/entries/bowege.html : The life of Alfred Wegener

 

If your child is entering my class this year please click on my email link below and send me a short message about what type of learner your child is and anything you wish me to know about her/him.

Russell Ewick Webmaster and Fifth Grade Teacher
 

Http://www.empire.k12.ca.us/glick/roome8/

Stroud Elementary School
400 Frazine Rd. Modesto, Ca. 95357
 (209)-577-3495
 rewick@ctap6.k12.ca.us     rewick@empire.k12.ca.us
"Imagination is more important than knowledge..."
Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

By Russ Ewick

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